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Book Review : Actual Innocence

Saturday 2 November 2002 in Literature 10 Comment(s)

Actual Innocence : by Barry Scheck, Peter Neufeld, and Jim Dwyer, Doubleday, New York, New York, 2000. Imagine what it would be like to be convicted of a brutal murder and then sentenced to die by lethal injection. Imagine languishing on death row for years as appeal after appeal is turned down.




The Gift of Fear by Gavin de Becker

Saturday 2 November 2002 in Literature 1 Comment(s)

Dell Publishing, New York, New York, 1997 Through street experience, police officers develop a sixth sense about danger. They learn to rely on and use the signals that victims often deny or discount. Sometimes, though, the lessons come at too great a price.




Digital Evidence and Computer Crime: Forensic Science, Computers, and the Intern

Saturday 2 November 2002 in Literature 2 Comment(s)

by Eoghan Casey, Academic Press, San Diego, California, 2000. As a place to begin in the investigation of computer-based crime, Digital Evidence and Computer Crime represents a very good start. As the title implies, the author works toward a comprehensive explanation of a series of very complex and technical, yet related, issues. Fortunately, he provides well-written and easily understandable explanations, albeit technically abbreviated, throughout. The information he provides in this context allows for concept transition as the text continues into the strategic and tactical application of pursuit. For a new inductee into the world of computers and law enforcement, this book should be on the shelf. While it will not solve the case, it will provide the “rookie” with a number of very well-described starting points. The chapters are designed to build off the previous ones in terms of an introduction, through basic vocabulary and terminology, and then stepping into the issues associated with law enforcement response. Perhaps, the best aspect of this book is the inclusion of case examples, which highlight various points Mr. Casey makes throughout. Two of the chapters focus on the behavioral/ motivational aspects of computer crime. Each embraces the topic from academia and contain good information, although somewhat limited with respect to long-term utility. While the technology continues to evolve, so too will the targets and the suspect’s methodology. One chapter focuses on the legal and jurisdictional aspects of these issues. The referenced cases occurred in the mid to late 1990s and, in terms of relativity to the discussion, are pertinent. There is, however, a growing list of additional case law, which should be thoroughly researched in any specific investigation involving search and seizure, intercept, and other complex issues. From the perspective of jurisdiction, the text briefly covers an issue that proves significant at any level in responding to and prosecution of computer-related crime. Accompanying the text is a multimedia CD separated into several sections, including an introduction, a cases section, and a reference section. The cases section permits the reader to commence hands-on pursuit of computer criminals by following a very basic fact set and using some of the knowledge from the book. These scenarios are primers only, but afford the reader with an opportunity for familiarization by hands-on interaction. The reference section provides a list of 24 Internet locations for the reader to continue learning or to obtain law enforcement assistance. As with any new area of law enforcement, the scope and breadth of understanding and response vary by individual, as well as by location and agency capability. This book is a great resource for any individual seeking knowledge or beginning to understand this growing phenomenon, as well as some of the issues associated with the operational and related strategic challenges. Reviewed by Resident Agent in Charge Matt Parsons U.S. Naval Criminal Investigative Service Okinawa, Japan This review was published in the July 2002 edition of the FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin null




Investigative Psychology - 1975-1996 Journal Articles

Sunday 9 December 2001 in Literature 8 Comment(s)

Alison, L.J. and Salfati, G. (1996). An Investigative Approach to Homicide Detection. In Baurmann, M. (Ed.) Offender Profiling and Case Analysis. Bundeskriminalamt: Wiesbaden. Choi, P., Gale. T., Hatton, C., Kebbell, M.R. & Newlands, P. (1995). Guidelines for Prospective Research Students. Leicester: British Psychological Society. Canter, D. (1995) The Facets of Place. In G.T. Moore and R.W. Marans (eds). Advances in Environment, Behavior and Design 4: The Integration of Theory, Research Methods and Utilization. London: Plenum press, 107-138. Canter, D. (1995) Psychology of offender profiling, in Bull, R, & Carson, D. (eds) Handbook of Psychology in Legal Contests. Chichester: Wiley Chapter 4.5 pp 343-335. Canter, D. and Kirby, S. (1995) Prior Convictions of Child Molesters. Science and Justice, vol.35, pp 73-78. Canter, D. & Sinha, A. (1995) Facets of Modernism and Post-Modernism in Landscape Architecture. Design for the Environment - the Interdisciplinary Challenge, ACSA: West Central Regional Conference. 114-122. Canter, D.V.C. Gregory, A. (1994) Identifying the residential location of rapists, Journal of the Forensic Science Society; 34; 169-175. Donald, I & Canter, D. (1994) Employee Attitudes and Safety in the Chemical Industry. Journal of Loss Prevention in the Process Industries, vol7, 203-208 Furnham, A. and Alison, L. (1994). Theories of Crime, Attitudes to Punishment and Juror Bias Amongst Police, Offenders and the General Public. Personality and Individual Differences., 17, No.1, 35-48. Canter, D. (1993) The wholistic organic researcher: Central issues in clinical research methodology, in Powell, G. Young,R. & Frosh, S. (eds) Curriculum in clinical psychology, Leicester: The wholistic organic researcher: Central issues in clinical research methodology. BPS pp 40-56. Canter, D. and Larkin, P. (1993) The Environmental Range of Serial Rapists. Journal of Environmental Psychology, vol.13, pp 93-99. Canter, D. (1992) An evaluation of 'Cusum' stylistic analysis of confessions, Expert Evidence. 1, (2) pp 93-99. Donald, I, & Canter, D. (1992). Intentionality and fatality during the King's Cross Underground fire. Volume 22, 203-218 Canter, D. (1991) Criminal Residential Location Canter, D & Donald, I. (1990) Accident by Design: Environmental, attitudinal and organisational aspects of accidents. Paper presented to Culture, space, history: 11th conference of the international association for the study of people and their physical settings, 8-12 July 1990 , Ankara, Turkey Canter, D, & Heritage, R. (1990) A multivariate model of sexual offence behaviour: Developments in 'Offender Profiling', The journal of Forensic Psychiatry. 1, (2). London Routledge pp 185-212. Canter, D. (1989) Offender Profiles, The Psychologist, 2, (1), pp 12-16. Canter, D. (1988) To catch A Rapist. New Society, 14-15. Canter, D. (1983) The potential of facet theory for applied social psychology. Quality and Quantity 17 pp35-67 Canter, D. (1983) Putting situations in their place. Chapter for "Social Behaviour in Context". A. Furnham (Ed). Allip & Bacon, Dec. 1983. Canter, S. & Canter, D. (1983) Bulletin of the British Psychological Society, Professional growth and psychological Education. 36, 283-287.* 15 Comber, M. and Canter, D. (1983) Differentiation of Malicious and Non-malicious Fire-Alarm Calls Using Multidimensional Scaling. Perceptual and Motor Skills, vol.57, pp 460-462. Canter, D. & Rees, K. (1982). Volume, 31, 185-208. Action & Place : The Existential Dialectic Canter, D. (1980-81) Fires and human behaviour: Emerging Issues. 41-46 Breaux, J. Canter, D. Sime, J. (1976) University of Surrey, Fire Research Unit, Guilford, Surrey, 5th International Fire Protection Seminar. Volume 2, 22-24. Psychological Aspects of Behaviour of People in Fire situations




Investigative Psychology - 1997 Journal Articles

Sunday 9 December 2001 in Literature 1 Comment(s)

Canter, D. (1997) The art of academic writing ( including dissertations). Canter, D. (1997) Beyond "Profiling": Psychology and the Investigative Process. Forensic Update, issue 48, pp 24-38. Canter, D. (1997) The Facets of place in G T Moore & R W Marans (eds) Advances in Environment, Behavior, and Design. 4. New York. Plenum. Pp 109-148 Canter, D. (1997) Words of Caution. Policing Today, March 12-15. Canter, D & Alison L J (1997) (eds) Criminal Detection and the Psychology of Crime. Ashgate, Dartmouth. Canter, D & Alison, L (1997) Precursors to Investigative Psychology in D. Canter and L. Alison (eds.) Criminal Detection and the Psychology of Crime. Aldershot: Ashgate, xv - xxx Canter, D. & Chester, J. (1997) Investigation into the claim of weighted Cusum in authorship attribution studies. Forensic Linguistics 4 (2) 253-261. Canter, D. & Kremer, M. (1997) Psychological Autopsy (K Mason).The Pathology of Trauma. Arnold, London. pp1-21 Canter, D., Missen, C, and Hodge, S. (1997) Are Serial Killers Special? Policing Today Canter, D. & Scott M J. (1997) Picture or Place? A Multiple Sorting Study of Landscape. Journal of Environmental Psychology 17, pp263-281. 1997 Academic Press Limited. Godwin, M. and Canter, D. (1997) Encounter and Death: The Spatial Behaviour of U.S. Serial Killers. Policing: International Journal of Police Strategy and Management, vol.20, (1), pp 24-38. Kebbell, M.R. (1997). Should we use hypnosis to interview eyewitnesses? Forensic Update, 50, 10-13. Kebbell, M.R. & Wagstaff, G.F. (1997). Why do the Police interview eyewitnesses? Interview objectives and the evaluation of eyewitness performance. The Journal of Psychology, 131, 595-601. Kebbell, M.R. & Wagstaff, G.F. (1997). An investigation into the influence of hypnosis on the confidence and accuracy of eyewitness recall. Contemporary Hypnosis, 14, 157-166.




Investigative Psychology - 1998 Journal Articles

Sunday 9 December 2001 in Literature 6 Comment(s)

Alison, L. J. and Salfati, C. G. (1998). An Investigative Psychology Approach to Crime Scene Analysis. In Bundeskriminalamt publications. International Symposium of Methods of Crime Analysis and Offender Profiling. Wiesbaden, Germany Canter, D. (1998) Profiling as Poison. Inter-alia., 2 (1), 10-11. Canter, D (1998) A New Awakening Journal of Environmental Psychology 18 pp 1-2. Academic Press Canter, D. & Alison, L. Precursors to investigative psychology. Criminal Detection and the Psychology of Crime. Ashgate. pp xv-xxx Canter, D. and Fritzon, K. (1998) Differentiating Arsonists: A model of Firesetting Actions and Characteristics. Legal and Criminological Psychology, vol.3, pp 73-96. Canter, D & Hodge, S. Victims of Male Sexual Assault. Journal of Interpersonal Violence. Vol 13, No2. April 1998 pp222-239. Sage publications. Canter, D. Hughes, D, & Kirby, S. (1998) Paedophilia: Pathology, criminality, or both? The development of a multivariate model of offence behaviour in child sexual abuse. The Journal of Forensic Psychiatry, 9 (3), pp532-555. Routledge Dodd, N.J. (1998) Insurance Claim Fraud : Applying Psychology to the reduction of Insurance Claim Fraud. Insurance Trends. Issue 18 pp11-16. Assoc. of British Insurers. Kebbell, M.R.,Wagstaff, G.F. & Preece, D. (1998). The effect of knowledge that testimony was elicited with a cognitive interview on jurors' judgments of guilt. Psychology, Crime and Law , 14, 17-25 Kebbell, M.R., Milne, R. & Wagstaff, G.F. (1998). The cognitive interview: A survey of its forensic effectiveness. Psychology, Crime and Law, 5, 101-115. Kebbell, M.R. & Wagstaff, G.F. (1998). Hypnotic interviewing: The best way to interview eyewitnesses? Behavioral Sciences and the Law, 16, 115-129. Kebbell, M.R. & Milne, R. (1998). Police officers' perception of eyewitness factors in forensic investigations: A survey. The Journal of Social Psychology, 138, 323-330. Salfati, C G & Canter, D (1998) Differentiating Stranger Murders : Profiling Offender Characteristics from Behavioral Styles Journal of Behavioral Sciences and the Law Seager, P., Kebbell, M.R. & Wiseman, R. (in press). Interviewing: a psychological perspective. In R. Messer & F. Smith (Eds.) Psychology for Social Workers and Probation Officers. Hatfield: Harvester. Sinha, A & Ito, M (1998) The Meaning of Places Open House International 23, (4), pp32-41




Investigative Psychology - 1999 Journal Articles

Sunday 9 December 2001 in Literature 5 Comment(s)

Aked, I. P., Canter, D., Sanford, A. I., & Smith, N. (1999) Approaches to the Scientific Attribution of Authorship. In D. Canter,& L. Alison, (eds) Profiling in Policy and Practice, Aldershot: Ashgate 157 -188 Alison, L. and Canter, D. (1999) Professional, Legal and Ethical Issues in Offender Profiling in Canter, D. & Alison, L. (1999) (eds.) Profiling in Policy and Practice Aldershot: Ashgate 21 -54 Canter, D & Alison, L J (eds) (1999) Interviewing and Deception. Offender Profiling Series Vol I : Interviewing and Deception. Ashgate, Aldershot. pp. 1-21 Canter, D & Alison, L J (eds) (1999) Profiling in Policy and Practice. Offender Profiling Series Vol II : Profiling in Policy and Practice. Ashgate, Aldershot. pp. 1-19 Canter ,D. (1999) Equivocal Death in D. Canter, & L. Alison, (eds.) Profiling in Policy and Practice Aldershot: Ashgate 123 - 156 Canter, D. (1999) Destructive Organisational Psychology in D. Canter, & L. Alison (eds) The Social Psychology of Crime: Groups, Teams and Networks. Aldershot: Ashgate. Canter, D & Alison L, (1999) (eds) The Social Psychology of Crime: Groups, Teams and Networks. Aldershot: Ashgate. Canter, D & Alison L, (1999) The Social Psychology of Crime, in D. Canter, & L. Alison (eds) The Social Psychology of Crime: Groups, Teams and Networks. Aldershot: Ashgate. Canter, D. & Alison, L. (1999) Interviewing and Deception in Canter, D. & Alison, L. (1999) (eds.) Interviewing and Deception Aldershot: Ashgate 1 - 22 Canter, D. & Alison, L. (1999) (eds.) Profiling in Policy and Practice Aldershot: Ashgate Alison, L.J. & Canter, D.V. (1999). Profiling in Policy and Practice. In Canter, D.V. & Alison, L.J. (Eds.) Profiling in Policy and Practise. Offender Profiling Series Vol. II. Ashgate: Dartmouth. Canter, D. & Cremer M (1999) Psychological Autopsy in K Mason & BN Purdue (eds) The Pathology of Trauma. Arnold, London. pp475-487 Leonard, R & Alison, L J (1999) Critical incident stress debriefing and its effects on coping strategies and anger in a sample of Australian police officers involved in shooting incidents. Work and Stress 13 (2) pp144-161. O'Keeffe, C. and Alison. L. (1999). Psychic Rhetoric in Psychic Detection. Journal for the Society for Psychical Research. Salfati, C G & Canter, D (1999) Differentiating Stranger Murders: Profiling Offender Characteristics from Behavioral Styles Journal of Behavioral Sciences and the Law




Investigative Psychology - 2000 Journal Articles

Sunday 9 December 2001 in Literature 7 Comment(s)

Canter, D. (2000) Offender Profiling and Psychological Differentiation Journal of Criminal and Legal Psychology Canter, D. (2000) Health and Environmental Aesthetics in B. Cold (ed) Canter,D. (2000) The Violated Body. In S. Sweeney & T Benton(eds) Journal of Popular Science. Cambridge University Press Canter, D. (200) Seven Assumptions for an Investigative Environmental Psychology. Canter, D. (2000) Psychological Autopsy in Encyclopedia of Forensic Science Canter, D. (2000) Forensic Linguistics in Encyclopedia of Forensic Science Canter, D. (2000) Investigative Psychology in Encyclopedia of Forensic Science Canter, D & Alison L, (2000) (eds.) Profiling Property Crimes. Aldershot: Ashgate. Canter, D & Alison L, (2000) Profiling Property Crimes. In D. Canter, & L. Alison L, (eds.) Profiling Property Crimes. Aldershot: Ashgate. Canter, D. and Alison, L. (2000) (eds.) Profiling Rape and Murder Aldershot: Ashgate Canter, D. V. and Alison, L.J. (2000). The Social Psychology of Crime. In Canter, D.V. and Alison, L.J. (Eds). The Social Psychology of Crime: Groups, Teams and Networks. Offender Profiling Series Vol. III. Ashgate: Dartmouth. Canter, D. & Alison, L. Precursors to investigative psychology. Criminal Detection and the Psychology of Crime. Ashgate. pp xv-xxx Canter D, Coffey T, Huntley M & Missen C (2000) Predicting Serial Killers' Home Base Using a Decision Support System. Journal of Quantitative Criminology, 16 (4) Canter, D. and Hodge, S.(2000) Criminal's Mental Maps in Atlas of Crime Myklebust, T. and Alison, L.J. (2000). The current state of police interviews with children in Norway: How discrepant are they from models based on current issues in memory and communication? Psychology, Crime and Law, Vol. 6, pp 331-351 Salfati, C. G. (2000). The Psychological Classification of Murder. In Canter, D. V and Alison, L. J. Investigative Psychology, Volume 3: Profiling Rape and Murder. Dartmouth Press: Aldershot Salfati, C. G. (2000) Profiling Homicide: A Multidimensional Approach. Homicide Studies Vol4, No3, 265-293 Salfati, C. G. (July 2000) The Nature Of Expressiveness And Instrumentality In Homicide, And It's Implications For Offender Profiling. Federal Bureau of Investigation Publication




Professional Homicide Investigation: A Personal Perspective

Saturday 17 November 2001 in Literature 11 Comment(s)

By Vernon J. Geberth, M.S., M.P.S.
Former Commander, Bronx Homicide, NYPD


The world of the homicide detective is permeated with human tragedies which involve a variety of sudden and violent death scenarios. Many of these events, which are seemingly beyond the comprehension of the average person, reveal motivations and patterns of repetition which are recognized by experienced detectives. They become keenly aware of the reality of death and the impact it has on both society and the surviving family.




Criminal Justice Literature - NCJRS Abstracts

Thursday 15 November 2001 in Literature 8 Comment(s)

Search Abstract Database
STUDY: Bloch, P. B., & Bell, J. (1976). Managing investigations: The Rochester system. Washington, DC: Urban Institute. Criminal Justice Abstract #18128 STUDY: Cohen, B., & Chaiken, J. (1987). Investigators Who Perform Well. Washington, DC Criminal Justice Abstract #56379 STUDY: Cordner, G. W. (1989). Police agency size and investigative effectiveness. Journal of Criminal Justice, 17(3), 145-155.Criminal Justice Abstract #48742 STUDY: Eck, J. E. (1979). Managing case assignments: The burglary investigation decision model replication. Washington, DC: Police Executive Research Forum. Criminal Justice Abstract #24769 STUDY: Eck, J. E. (1983). Solving crimes: The investigation of burglary and robbery. Washington, DC: Police Executive Research Forum. Criminal Justice Abstract #33087 STUDY: Elliott, J. F. (1978). Crime control teams: An alternative to the conventional operational procedure of investigating crimes. Journal of Criminal Justice, (6)1, 11-23. NCJRS Abstract #47736 STUDY: Ericson, R. V. (1981). Making crime: A study of detective work. Toronto: Butterworths. Criminal Justice Abstract #28989 STUDY: Feeney, F., Dill, F., & Weir, A. (1983). Arrests without conviction: How often they occur and why. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice. Criminal Justice Abstract #35865 STUDY: Forst, B., Leahy, Jr. F. J., Shirhall, J., Tyson, H. L., & Bartolomeo, J. (1982). Arrest convictability as a measure of police performance - summary report. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice. NCJRS Abstract #80954 STUDY: Gaines, L. K., Lewis, B., & Swanagin, R. (1983). Case screening in criminal investigations: A case study of robberies. Police Studies, 6(2), 22-29. Criminal Justice Abstract #34175 STUDY: Gay, W.G., Beall, T.M., & Bowers, R.A. (1984). A four site assessment of the Integrated Criminal Apprehension Program: final report. Washington, DC: University City Science Center. Criminal Justice Abstract #42013 STUDY: Gay, W. G., Day, H. T., & Woodward, J. P. (1977). National evaluation program phase I summary report - Neighborhood team policing. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office. Criminal Justice Abstract #19574 STUDY: Gray, P., & Heitzman, W. R. (1976). A detective allocation model. Journal of Criminal Justice, 4, 341-346. Criminal Justice Abstract #19321 STUDY: Greenberg, B., Yu, O. S., & Lang, K. I. (1973). Enhancement of the Investigative Function. Sacramento, CA: Stanford Research Institute. Criminal Justice Abstract #13932 STUDY: Greenberg, B., Elliott, C. V., Kraft, L. P., & Proctor, H. S. (1977). Felony investigation decision model: An analysis of investigative elements of information. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office. Criminal Justice Abstract #20476 STUDY: Greenberg, I., & Wasserman, R. (1979). Managing criminal investigations. Washington, DC: National Institute of Law Enforcement and Criminal Justice. Criminal Justice Abstract #24749 STUDY: Greenwood, P. W., Chaiken, J. M., & Petersilia, J. (1977). The criminal investigation process. Lexington, MA: D.C. Heath and Company. NCJRS Abstract #40597 STUDY: Horvath, F., & Meesig, R. (1998). A content analysis of textbooks on criminal investigation: An evaluative comparison to empirical research findings on the investigative process and the role of forensic evidence. Journal-of-Forensic-Science, 43(1), 133-140. Criminal Justice Abstract #72325 STUDY: Kuykendall, J. (1982). The criminal investigative process: Toward a conceptual framework. Journal of Criminal Justice, 10, 131-145. Criminal Justice Abstract #30881 STUDY: Kuykendall, J. (1986). The municipal police detective: An historical analysis. Criminology, 24(1), 175-201. Criminal Justice Abstract #42091 STUDY: Kuykendall, J., & Roberg, R. R. (1982). Mapping police organizational change: From a mechanistic toward an organic model. Criminology, 20(2), 241-256. Criminal Justice Abstract #31867 STUDY: Miyazawa, S. (1992). Policing in Japan: A study on making crime. Albany: State University of New York Press. Criminal Justice Abstract #355805 STUDY: Peterson, J. L., Mihajlovic, S., & Gilliland, M. (1984). Forensic evidence and the police: The effects of scientific evidence on criminal investigations. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice. Criminal Justice Abstract #36479 STUDY: Phillips Jr., R. G. (1988 August). Training priorities in state and local law enforcement. FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin, pp. 10-16. NCJRS Abstract #113474 STUDY: Pogrebin, M. (1976). Some observations of the detective role. Journal of Police Science and Administration, 4(3), 277-284. NCJRS Abstract #38092 STUDY: Poole, E. D., & Pogrebin, M. R. (1989). Attribution and empathy: Detectives and subjects under arrest. Police Studies, 12(3), 132-140. Criminal Justice Abstract #49912 STUDY: Regan, K. J., Nalley, P. G., & White, T. (1979). Managing criminal investigations: A summary report. Unpublished report: Urban Institute. Criminal Justice Abstract #24664 STUDY: Reppetto, T.A. (1975). The influence of police organizational style on crime control effectiveness. Journal of Police Science and Administration, 3(3), 274-279. Criminal Justice Abstract #16583 STUDY: Reppetto, T. A. (1980). Police organization and management. In R.A. Staufenberger (Ed.), Progress in policing: Essays on change (pp. 65-84). Cambridge, MA: Ballinger. NCJRS Abstract #75833 STUDY: Sanders, W. B. (1977). Detective work: A study of criminal investigations. New York: Free Press. Criminal Justice Abstract #20431 STUDY: Schwartz, A. I., & Clarren, S. N. (1977). The Cincinnati team policing experiment: A summary report. Washington, DC: Police Foundation, Urban Institute. Criminal Justice Abstract #20742 STUDY: Sherman, L. W., Milton, K. H., & Kelly, T. V. (1973). Team policing: Seven case studies. Washington, DC: Police Foundation. Criminal Justice Abstract #13385 STUDY: Simms, B. W., & Petersen, E. R. (1989). The economics of criminal investigation in a municipal police force. Journal of Criminal Justice, 17, 199-224. Criminal Justice Abstract #48747 STUDY: Simon, D. (1991). Homicide: A year on the killing streets. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company. Criminal Justice Abstract #53565 STUDY: Skogan, W. G., & Antunes, G. E. (1979). Information, apprehension, and deterrence: Exploring the limits of police productivity. Journal of Criminal Justice, 7, 217-241. Criminal Justice Abstract #24489 STUDY: Public Systems Evaluation. (1977). An alternative approach in police patrol: The Wilmington split-force experiment. An evaluation report. Cambridge, MA: Author. Criminal Justice Abstract #20710 STUDY: Waegel, W. B. (1982). Patterns of police investigation of urban crimes. Journal of Police Science and Administration, 10 (4), 452-465. Criminal Justice Abstract # 33064 STUDY: Willman, M. T., & Snortum, J. R. (1984). Detective work: The criminal investigation process in a medium-size police department. Criminal Justice Review, 9(1), 33-39. Criminal Justice Abstract #36130 STUDY: Wilson, J. Q. (1978). The investigators: Managing the FBI and narcotics agents. New York: Basic Books. Criminal Justice Abstract # 21543 STUDY: Wycoff, M. A. (1982). Evaluating the crime-effectiveness of municipal police. In J.R. Greene (Ed.), Managing police work: Issues and analysis (pp. 15-36). Beverly Hills, CA: Sage. NCJRS Abstract #84731




Edward Mitchell

Wednesday 14 November 2001 in Literature 10 Comment(s)

Edward Mitchell is an Associate of the Centre for Criminological Research, University of Oxford and a Sub-Editor of "Forensic Update", the journal of the Division of Criminological and Legal Psychology of the British Psychological Society. He is also a Consultant in behavioural science to law enforcement and criminal justice agencies in the UK and US. A past Research Fellow in Psychiatry and Law at Harvard University, Mitchell is an alumni of the University of Oxford (B.A. (Hons) Experiemental Psychology) and the University of Cambridge (M.Phil Criminology and Doctor of Philosophy (Institute of Criminology)). He is currently conducting post-doctoral research in Behavioral Ecology at the University of Oxford. Widely published, Mitchell's articles have appeared in numerous legal and scientific journals including the "Journal of Forensic Psychiatry" and the "International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology". Published journal articles and book reviews: Mitchell, E. W. (1998). Science and law. Forensic Update, 52, pp. 23-26. Mitchell, E. W. (1998). Psychologists as expert witnesses. Forensic Update, 54, pp. 26-29. Mitchell, E. W. (1999). Does psychiatric disorder affect the likelihood of violent offending? A review and critique of the major findings. Medicine, Science and the Law, 39 (1), pp. 23-30. Mitchell, E. W. (1999). “Forensic Psychiatry, Race and Culture” by S. Fernando, D. Ndegwa, & M. Wilson (eds.). Forensic Update, 56, pp. 54-56. Mitchell, E. W. (1999). “Criminal Law” by W. Wilson. British Society of Criminology Newsletter, 38, pp. 3. Mitchell, E. W. (1999). Meta-responsibility and mental disorder: causing the conditions of one’s own insanity plea. Journal of Forensic Psychiatry, 10 (3), p. 597-622. Terry, K. J. & Mitchell, E. W. (1999). Is motivation necessary? Forensic Update, 59, pp. 7-12. Mitchell, E. W. (2000). A Szaszian view of forensic psychology. Forensic Update, 60, pp. 15-19. Mitchell, E. W. (in press). “Race & IQ” by Ashley Montagu (ed.). British Journal of Forensic Practice. Mitchell, E. W. (in press). “Law without Enforcement” by Eastman, N. & Peay, J (eds.). British Society of Criminology Newsletter. Mitchell, E. W. (in press). Psychiatric Concepts of Justification, Excuse and Mitigation by Alec Buchanan. Journal of Critical Psychology, Psychotherapy and Counselling. Terry, K. J. & Mitchell, E. W. (in press). Motivation in sex offender treatment efficacy: leading a horse to water AND making it drink? International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology. Mitchell, E. W. (manuscript in revision). The meta-responsibility doctrine: legal, psychiatric and historical antecedents to causing one’s own insanity plea. International Journal of Law and Psychiatry. Conference/seminar papers: “Madness and meta-responsibility: Causing the conditions of one’s own insanity plea” to the Psychological Models in Criminal Justice Group (London, UK, July 24th 1998). “Meta-responsibility and mental disorder: the final nail in McNaughton’s coffin?” to the American Society of Criminology Annual Meeting (Washington DC, USA, November 1998). “The serial murderer, psychiatry and disorder acquiescence” to the American Society of Criminology Annual Meeting (Washington DC, USA, November 1998). “Culpable mental disorder: the gaping hole in the insanity defence” to the British Psychological Society Division of Criminological and Legal Psychology (Durham, UK, September 1998). “Sex offender treatment efficacy: is success contingent on participant motivation?” to the American Psychology-Law Society (APLS) and European Association of Psychology & Law (EAPL) International Conference (Dublin, Ireland, July 1999). “Meta-responsibility and mental disorder: the final nail in McNaughton's coffin?” to the British Society of Criminology Conference (Liverpool, UK, July 1999). “Existential-phenomenological foundations of serial murder” (Kathy Curran, co-author) to the American Society of Criminology Annual Meeting (Toronto, Canada, November 1999). “Born again? The meaning and significance of religious rebirth in prison” (2nd author to Kathy Curran) to the American Society of Criminology Annual Meeting (Toronto, Canada, November 1999). “Dual systems of incapacitation for sexual predators: analysing the necessity of civil commitment” (2nd author to Karen Terry) to the American Society of Criminology Annual Meeting (Toronto, Canada, November 1999). Unpublished manuscripts and tools: Mitchell, E. W. (1997). The aetiology of serial murder: towards an integrated model. Unpublished M.Phil. thesis, University of Cambridge. Bursztajn, H.J. & Mitchell, E.W. (2000). Seven stages to achieving a reliable, relevant, admissible, ethical and effective expert opinion v. 1.0. Experimental HTML expert witness decision making tool, Harvard University.




The Need for a Coordinated Response to Global Crime

Thursday 20 September 2001 in Literature 1 Comment(s)

The end of the Cold War meant a significant change in the nature of the foreign threats to U.S. security. The principal worry of most Americans is no longer a devastating military offensive from abroad, but rather more insidious assaults which hit closer to home, threatening lives and property and creating a climate of fear.




IC21: The Intelligence Community in the 21st Century

Thursday 20 September 2001 in Literature 0 Comment(s)

With the reduction in the Russian nuclear threat and a lessening of that nation's support for insurgencies around the world, the Intelligence Community has shifted more of its resources
to focus on other problems of growing importance: proliferation of weapons of mass destruction; terrorism; drug trafficking and
weapons transfers -- also topics of interest to the law enforcement community.




Pulling Together:Region Uses Case Profiling to Shed Light on Unsolved Murder Cas

Saturday 4 August 2001 in Literature 1 Comment(s)

Journal: Sheriff Volume: 51 Issue: 1 Dated: January-February 1999 Pages: 28 To 31

Author: J Slama


This article examines a four-state program to pool homicide information.

Law enforcement agencies in Utah, Idaho, Wyoming, and Nevada collaborated in an attempt to solve a series of murders. They used the criminal profiling approach, analyzing criminal behaviors in the cases and looking for similarities. The filters of profiling which the group outlined for each case included: (1) the relationship between victim and offender and the probability that they knew each other; (2) identification of the possible initial contact, where the victim was last seen, relationship of the offender with that location; (3) answering those same questions with regard to the crime scene and the body disposal site; (4) the position of the body, which can help determine whether the disposal site was planned or opportunistic; (5) physical injuries on the body; (6) evidence of sexual assault, including DNA tests; (7) what is known about the suspect; (8) whether the killing was a method of operation or signature killing; and (9) whether the offender's behavior was organized or disorganized.




Criminal Profiling: Science and Art

Saturday 4 August 2001 in Literature 8 Comment(s)

Journal of Contemporary Criminal Justice Volume: 15 - Issue: 3 - Dated: August 1999 - Pages: 230 To 241 Patrick E. Cook ; Dayle L. Hinman This overview of criminal profiling of violent criminals discusses definitions of profiling, the training and expertise necessary to do profiling, how profiling can be helpful in criminal investigations, the types of crimes that lend themselves to profiling, and the profiling process. The discussion notes that criminal personality profiling is a technique for identifying the major personality, behavioral, and demographic characteristics of offenders based on an analysis of their crimes. It differs significantly from the clinical personality profiling done by mental health professionals in the course of clinical and forensic practice. The most effective profilers are highly trained, experienced investigators. Crimes that lend themselves to the most detailed profiles are often those that are part of a series of similar crimes. It is often easier to profile unusual crimes, particularly those with signature characteristics, behavior prints, or signs of staging, than more common violent crimes. Working with a small profiling team is the most productive approach to the profiling process. The scientific status of profiling depends on the reliability and validity of the various types of forensic-science core knowledge used by the profiler, the reliability and validity of the violent crime database, and the reliability and validity of the profiling process itself. Further research may enable profiling to become more of a science and less of an art.




Criminal Profiling: An Introduction to Behavioral Evidence Analysis

Saturday 4 August 2001 in Literature 6 Comment(s)

Brent E. Turvey M.S. 1999 495 Pages ISBN 0-12-705040-X This text explains the deductive profiling method that the author developed; deductive profiling differs from other forms of criminal profiling in that it approaches each criminal incident as its own universe of behaviors and relationships, centers the process on forensic evidence, and does not use averaged statistical profiles. The text is intended for students and professionals in the law enforcement, mental health, criminological, and legal communities. Individual sections explain the features of inductive and deductive reasoning and criminal profiling, the details of the deductive profiling method, the legal aspects involved in profiling, and specific profiling issues that arise in different types of serial crimes. Topics include case assessment, crime reconstruction, wound pattern analysis, victim profiles and risk assessment, crime-scene characteristics, criminal methods, signatures, motivational typologies, offender characteristics, psychopathy and sadism, and investigative strategy. Further topics include trial strategy, ethics and the criminal profiler, alternative methods of offender profiling, crimes involving fire and explosives, serial rape, serial homicide, and criminal behavior on the Internet. Photographs, figures, checklists, appended case examples and additional guidelines, chapter reference lists, glossary, and index.




Text : Offender Profiling and Crime Analysis by Peter Ainsworth

Thursday 14 June 2001 in Literature 1 Comment(s)

Offender Profiling and Crime Analysis
Peter B Ainsworth


"Offender profiling is a set of techniques used by law enforcement agencies to try to identify perpetrators of serious crime. There has been a rapidly growing interest in this subject over recent years. Profiling techniques have been used increasingly by police forces in many parts of the world, while fictional representations in films and television series like Silence of the Lambs and Cracker have generated an enormous popular fascination with the topic.




Texts

Monday 30 April 2001 in Literature 2 Comment(s)

Not really an Article per se as a noteworthy compilation of the various texts which I have thrown together this morning. You'll note, if you are of a mind to do so, that they range from critical and analytical texts to memoirs of the 'Who's Who' of Criminal Profiling. I'll be doing my own separate reviews as I get around to them, in the meantime feel free to post one yourself. Most of you will have already read or familiarized yourself to some degree with writers like John Douglas and Robert Ressler, but what about...




 

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